Season 2 – Your Culture Raises You

Hyphenated, the Podcast is a show about cultural identity. Through conversations, reflections and more formal interviews (and with lots of laughter) the show explores how Canadians identify, and how those identities are determined. This show is meant to be a mix of education, comedy, and it hopes to include its entire audience in several conversations about how to make sense of being more than one thing at any given time.

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Newest Episode:

Season 2, Episode 17
Release: Monday February 18, 2019

African History is Black History Series: Winnie Madikizela Mandela

 

 

Older Episodes:

Season 2, Episode 1
Released: Monday October 1, 2018

CCTV
This episode is a recap of my recent trip to Ghana and Togo. There are a few surprises in this episode, and it provides insight into my experiences in Accra, Cape Coast, Kumasi and Tema in Ghana and Lome in Togo.

Music heard in this episode is CCTV by Ghanaian artists King Promise, Sarkodie and Mugeez. 

 

Season 2, Episode 2
Released: Monday October 8, 2018

Diaspora Politics with Bridget Boakye
During my time in Accra, Ghana I made time to sit down and speak to Bridget Boakye. Bridget is a partner in three startups in Ghana – Talents in Africa (talentsinafrica.com), Chale Kasa (chalekasa.com) and Africa Schools Online (africaschoolsonline.com). A true change maker and thought leader in Ghana.

 

Season 2, Episode 3
Released: Monday October 15, 2018

Taboo
In honour of World Mental Health Day – observed on Wednesday October 10, 2018 – this episode is a discussion of how the experience of anxiety, depression and suicide are different for migrant communities, African migrant communities in particular.

 

Season 2, Episode 5
Released: Monday October 21, 2018

Drive, with Aisha Addo
This episode is an interview with Aisha Addo, the CEO and Founder of DriveHER, a ride sharing app based out of the city of Toronto (www.driveher.ca). Repping Ghana, Aisha was super down-to-earth, and a boss lady on all accounts. This interview touched on feminism, culture, Africa, sexual assault and much more.

 

Season 2, Episode 6
Released: Monday November 5, 2018

International Love: The Problem with 90 Day Fiance’s Michael and Angela
This episode is a result of a discussion I was having with my friend about the problematic nature of the relationship between #MichaelandAngela on #90DayFiance and its implications for the way North Americans feel about immigrants.

Music featured in this episode is “No Fake Love” by Lil Kesh.

 

Season 2, Episode 7
Released: Monday November 12, 2018

We Demand a Recount? The 2018 U.S. mid-term elections
This episode is a reflection on the results of the 2018 U.S. elections for Congress, the Senate and Governorship.

 

Season 2, Episode 8
Released: Monday November 18, 2018

Asylum-seeking Refugees and Global Anti-Black Racism
This episode is a reaction to a story in the paper about asylum-seeking refugees. It starts the discussion of how Canada wants and thrives off of its refugee programs, but those programs are anti-Black. I make the argument that this is one of the indirect ways that they show us that Blackness is not part of the Canadian national identity.

 

Season 2, Episode 9
Released: Monday December 3, 2018

The Mean Streets of Toronto, an interview with King
In this episode, King and I talk about what it’s like to be disconnected, poor, and Black in the City of Toronto. Music in this episode is “Black” by King. Available on iTunes and Spotify.

 

Season 2, Episode 10
Released: Monday December 17, 2018

Giving & Receiving
This episode is a reflection on how we give and receive from our loved ones in the African culture. I want us to remain cautious of some of our cultural tendencies and start to give more thoughtfully, carefully and wholly.

 

Season 2, Episode 11
Released: Monday December 31, 2018

Hyphenated Girls Talk: Womanhood in 2018

I recently celebrated by 28th birthday and felt invited my closest friends to my home to celebrate. This episode provides insight into the thoughts of four millennial African-Canadian women on the concept of womanhood and all that it encompasses. I think it is important to take moments in time to reflect on where you thought you’d be, what the world says you should be, and who you are. This is also a time when #metoo and #timesup have started to reshape womanhood and what we can come to expect.

 

Season 2, Episode 12
Released: Monday January 7, 2019

The African Celebrity
This episode is about how African celebrities are using their power and influence to redirect positive attention to Africa. In line with the value of Sankofa, these celebrities are really drawing attention to the continent and highlighting the importance of investing in small or large ways in the Black continent.

 

Season 2, Episode 15
Released: Monday February 4, 2019

African History is Black History Series: Kwame Nkrumah

Often when Black History Month rolls around, we focus on the emancipation efforts that happened in North America. I get pretty offended that we don’t pay homage to the emancipation efforts that took place in other Black spaces around the world, so this month I will profile 4 people–their history, their accomplishments, and their legacy–in the hopes in expanding conversations about Black History to include all of the interconnected revolutions that have allowed for us to enjoy the freedoms we have today across the African Diaspora. Episode 35 is about Kwame Nkrumah, the first President of Ghana, Sub-Saharan Africa’s first independent state.

References:
Botwe-Asamoah, Kwame. (2004). Kwame Nkrumah’s Politico-Cultural Thought and Policies. Routledge.
Nkrumah, Kwame. (1972). I Speak of Freedom: a Statement of African Ideology. Greenwood Press: Westport, CT.

 

Season 2, Episode 16
Released: Monday February 11, 2019

African History is Black History Series: Patrice Lumumba
Often when Black History Month rolls around, we focus on the emancipation efforts that happened in North America. I get pretty offended that we don’t pay homage to the emancipation efforts that took place in other Black spaces around the world, so this month I will profile 4 people. Their history, their accomplishments and their legacy in the hopes in sparking conversations about what happened across the African Diaspora. Last week’s episode was Kwame Nkrumah, this week is the Democratic Republic of Congo’s first democratically-elected President, Patrice Lumumba.

References:
Smyth, Patrick. (2018). Brussels sets straight historical wrong over Patrice Lumumba killing. Irish Times (July 5).
Wallerstein, Immanuel & Cordell, Dennis D. (2019). Patrice Lumumba: Congolese Politician. Encyclopedia Britannica.